Short Courses

 

 


The optional short courses, to be held the day before the opening of the Conference. Three courses will be offered, taught by internationally known experts in the field of Mesh Generation. Each short course will be two hours in length and include course notes and coffee breaks. Instructors will be addressing practical issues in the design and implementation of both structured and unstructured mesh generation codes.

The courses are ideal for students just entering the field needing a foundation for research, or for seasoned professionals who would like to expand their current skill-set in the development of mesh and grid generation algorithms. To register for the short courses, mark the appropriate boxes on the registration form. The price is $100 per attendee which includes course materials. Enrollment for short courses is limited to the first 30 paid registrants. If insufficient enrollment, short courses may be subject to cancellation. In event of cancellation or over-enrollment, all tuition will be refunded.

Time Topic Instructor(s)
9:30 - 11:30
1:00 - 3:00
3:30 - 5:30
Unstructured Meshing
Adaptivity
Geometry
Steve Owen
Graham Carey
Alla Sheffer, Tim Tautges

TOPIC: UNSTRUCTURED MESHING
STEVE OWEN, SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES

This short course will provide an overview of the principal techniques currently in use for constructing computational grids using unstructured methods. Delaunay, advancing front and octree methods will be described with respect to triangle and tetrahedral elements. An overview of current quadrilateral and hexahedral methods will be provided, including medial axis, paving, q-morph, sub-mapping, plastering, sweeping and whisker weaving as well as mixed element methods such as hex-tet and h-morph. A survey of some of the unstructured codes currently available will also be provided.

(Biography)

 

TOPIC: ADAPTIVE GRIDS
GRAHAM F CAREY, TICAM, THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN

In this segment of the course we begin with a brief discussion of adaptive grids and some illustrative examples demonstrating their potential in simulation of complex applications. Strategies for refining the mesh are then developed with the focus on fully unstructured cell subdivision strategies and point insertion techniques. The nature and properties of the underlying data structures will be covered as well as issues related to the quality of the elements and evolving mesh. Mathematical approaches for deriving appropriate error estimators and error indicators for adaptivity will be compared and their application to several problems will be demonstrated. We conclude with a brief discussion of questiosn related to solver algorithms and parallel computation using adaptive grids.

(Biography)

TOPIC: GEOMETRY
TIM TAUTGES, SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES
ALLA SHEFFER, UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA CHAMPAIGN

Mesh generation tools which work directly on CAD geometry have become more common in the last few years. Also, recent experience has shown that a significant portion of the time required to generate meshes is spent cleaning, defeaturing, and/or decomposing the geometric model. Thus, geometry is at the heart of the meshing process. This short course will introduce the basics of CAD model representations and modifications. Techniques for healing bad geometry, and for removing features from geometry, will be reviewed. Higher-level geometric techniques, e.g. feature extraction and medial axis representations, will be discussed. Finally, application programming interfaces to various geometry engines will be discussed.

(Biography)